The 10 Best Golf Balls for Mid Handicappers [2024 Edition]
Written by Matt Stevens

Matt Callcott-Stevens started playing golf at the age of 4 when Rory Sabattini's father put a 7-iron and putter in his hand. He has experienced all the highs and lows the game can throw at you and has now settled down as a professional golf writer. He holds a Postgraduate in Sports Marketing and has played golf for 28 years. Current Handicap: 8

Updated on January 3, 2024

This article breaks down what type of ball is best for mid handicap golfers and which brands to try.

I’ve played with more balls than I care to admit on my way to becoming a single digit handicap, so my goal is to help you find the perfect golf ball so that you can be on your way to shooting lower scores.

If you just need a quick recommendation, here are my top choices:

Top Pick
Runner Up
4.8
4.8
Pros:
  • Affordable
  • Low driver spin
  • Accelerated long-game ball speed
  • Softer greenside feel
  • Aerodynamic dimple pattern
Pros:
  • Entry-level price tag
  • Easily compressible
  • Maximum ball speed
  • Low long-game spin
  • Built for slower swing speed
Cons:
  • Limited wedge spin
  • Reduced feedback on short game shots
Cons:
  • Reduced greenside spin
  • Fast swing speeds may generate excess compression
Top Pick
4.8
Pros:
  • Affordable
  • Low driver spin
  • Accelerated long-game ball speed
  • Softer greenside feel
  • Aerodynamic dimple pattern
Cons:
  • Limited wedge spin
  • Reduced feedback on short game shots
Runner Up
4.8
Pros:
  • Entry-level price tag
  • Easily compressible
  • Maximum ball speed
  • Low long-game spin
  • Built for slower swing speed
Cons:
  • Reduced greenside spin
  • Fast swing speeds may generate excess compression

Why listen to us? Our team has tested and reviewed dozens and dozens of the top balls on the market (you can see those here). We keep detailed notes and findings about each one to come up with our list of recommendations for you.

 

1. Titleist TruFeel

Top Pick
Titleist TruFeel

This ball is known for its ultra soft feel, superior distance, and excellent greenside control.

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Pros

  • Affordable
  • Low driver spin
  • Accelerated long-game ball speed
  • Softer greenside feel
  • Aerodynamic dimple pattern

Cons

  • Limited wedge spin
  • Reduced feedback on short game shots

titleist trufeel review 3

Our best overall option for mid-handicappers is the long-flying, low-spinning, and soft-feeling Titleist TruFeel. Despite its distance design, I found the TruFeel performed better around the green than its counterparts.

My short game performance was boosted by the presence of its reformulated TruFlex cover. It softened the feel of chip shots and produced a soothing touch off the putter face. However, its soft feel did reduce feedback which superior golfers will despise.

However, high handicappers will appreciate the enhanced energy transfer delivered by the TruTouch Core. I saw my long game spin contained, and my ball speed accelerated on long shots leading to a high-launching ball.

Next, the High-Performance dimple pattern took over in the air and resisted drag while increasing lift. The outcome was elevated ball flight and sharp descent, leading to a soft landing. Finally, Titleist offers the TruFeel in matte red, yellow, and white. I found the yellow the easiest to trace in the air.

 

2. Callaway Supersoft

Runner Up
Callaway Supersoft

Supersoft has been one of the most popular golf balls for years. The new Hybrid Cover features a multi-material construction allows for an incredible combination of fast ball speeds from high launch and low spin, soft feel, and excellent greenside control.

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Pros

  • Entry-level price tag
  • Easily compressible
  • Maximum ball speed
  • Low long-game spin
  • Built for slower swing speed

Cons

  • Reduced greenside spin
  • Fast swing speeds may generate excess compression

The Callaway Supersoft and I are well acquainted, having played every version of this ball since its inception. Its expertly crafted 2-piece design proves highly compressible, generating explosive speed and minimal driver spin to get slow swing speeds and seniors airborne.

The latest edition of the Supersoft is a far cry from the original, offering a better all-around greenside performance. While the original sported a Tri-ionomer cover, I found the Hybrid Impact Paraloid cover on the newer editions delivers a superior feel and an element of wedge spin.

Short game play aside, I produced accelerated ball zip and minimal revolutions on long shots. I felt the Soft Compression Core was a breeze to strike and impart rapid speed onto the cover for a high, long launch.

Finally, the Supersoft range is ideal for golfers struggling to track and find the standard tour white ball. It’s offered in 5 colors, ranging from yellow to matte red, pink, orange, and green. While I appreciated the wealth of colors, I noticed the yellow construction was the easiest to follow.

 

3. TaylorMade Soft Response

TaylorMade Soft Response

Designed for golfers who want a soft feel with increased distance and accuracy. The low compression core and soft cover provide a responsive feel on all shots, while the aerodynamic design helps reduce drag for improved flight.

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Pros

  • Super easy to launch
  • Optimal carry distance
  • Minimal long-game spin
  • Incredible aerodynamics
  • Generates ample ball speed

Cons

  • More expensive than other distance balls
  • Not built for high swing speed

taylormade soft response 1

The TaylorMade Soft Response is the first 3-piece ball on our list for mid-handicappers, working for slow to medium swing speeds. In my experience, it was an easy launch, generated a stable flight, and reduced driver spin revolutions for maximal long game yards.

I found the low compression core was the key driver in the Soft Response, as it proved easy to boost energy transfer and produce the requisite ball velocity. My medium swing speed had no trouble getting the ball in the air. I could go one step further to say slow swing speeds can handle it.

Adding to my ball speed quest was the ionomer mantle between the cover and the core. It worked to enhance pace and minimize long game spin for consistent ball speed on all golf shots.

Lastly, I felt the steep and shallow dimple pattern was a genius design because it kept my ball in the air for as long as possible, with minimal deviation. Finally, I enjoyed the standard tour white finish, but players with visual impairments should try the easily traceable yellow finish.

 

4. Srixon Soft Feel

Srixon Soft Feel

One of the more affordable, quality balls on the market. With a soft center that gradually transitions to a firm outer edge, the FastLayer Core offers incredible softness and great distance off the tee. The dimple pattern reduces drag at launch and increases lift during descent.

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Pros

  • Affordable
  • Provides more greenside spin than most distance balls
  • Explosive core for increased rebound
  • Stable in the wind
  • Available in white and yellow

Cons

  • The high launch may deter lower handicappers
  • The medium greenside spin may prove insufficient for some lower handicappers

srixon soft feel 1

I first played the Srixon Soft Feel as a student because they were the only ball I could afford. But, a relationship born from necessity grew to an affectionate partnership, as the 2-piece distance ball provided an easy launch, consistent flight, and a soft feel around the green.

The SoftLayer Core proved the difference at impact on long shots, as I found it easy to compress. It rocketed off the clubface on high-impact strikes enjoying rampant pace and reduced spin for towering ball flight off the tee and on approach.

Granted, I cannot produce the spin revolutions I could with a Z-Star, but it is more than enough for a distance design. The average golfer will get around the dancefloor just fine with the Soft Feel, producing a surprisingly soft feel off the putter face.

Srixon also added a 338 Speed Dimple pattern to these tour yellow and white balls for an extended flight. In addition to boosting lift for increased carry, they offer efficient stability in the wind for reduced deviation.

 

5. Titleist AVX

Titleist AVX Golf Balls

Exceptionally soft feel, providing remarkable distance and penetrating flight. Boasts very low long game and iron spin.

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Pros

  • Optimal greenside spin
  • Explosive long-game speed
  • Reduced driver spin
  • Enhanced aerodynamics
  • Soft feel

Cons

  • Priced at a premium
  • Not suited to mid-handicappers with a slower swing speed

Although many golf pundits hastily suggest the famed Pro V1 to mid-handicappers, I find the AVX the better choice. For starters, the 3-piece ball carries a lower compression than its renowned relative, which I find easier to compress for moderate swing speeds like mine.

Most of the work was conducted by the Reformulated Core, which caused added rebound off the clubface. This allowed me to impart optimal pace onto the ball with minimal revolutions in my long game for a powerful launch and increased carry distance.

The High Flex Casing layer between the core and the cover further contributed to my long-game yardage. It restricted driver spin and prevented ball speed drop-off for consistent launch off the tee.

Unlike the distance balls on this list, the AVX delivered exceptional greenside spin thanks to its soft cast urethane cover. I enjoyed how the ball cover sunk into the grooves of my wedges and short irons, prompting increased backspin and control around the green.

Lastly, the 348 catenary dimple design resists drag on the way up and extends flight by boosting lift. Overall, I enjoyed a rounded performance of ample distance off the tee and spin around the green.

 

6. TaylorMade Tour Response

TaylorMade Tour Response

Ultra low 40 compression core (total ball compression of 70). Speedmantle with HFMq. Crosslinking chemical reaction creates an irreversible link for better shear resistance.

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Pros

  • Elevated compressibilty
  • Low driver spin
  • Increased wedge spin for improved short-game performance
  • Accelerated ball speed with the driver
  • Affordable price for a urethane ball

Cons

  • Clicky acoustics
  • Angle of the alignment aid can be off-putting on certain lies, like on a slope

TaylorMade Tour Response balls

After assessing the TaylorMade Tour Response, I’m genuinely impressed by their performance. As someone with a moderate swing speed, it’s a rarity to experience the consistent launch of a multi-layer urethane ball.

I really apprecaited its reduced long-game spin and quick ball velocity, paired with aerodynamic dimples that optimize both carry and overall range. Around the greens, its Soft Tough Urethane exterior melded seamlessly with my club grooves, delivering exceptional spin and precision in my short game.

While the Tour Response come with a steeper price tag than some mid-tier options, they’re competitively priced when compared with other urethane offerings such as the Pro V1 and TaylorMade TP5. Their value shines if you prioritize a blend of distance and finesse in your game.

 

7. Kirkland Signature Performance+

Kirkland Signature Performance+

3-piece urethane cover delivers high velocity, controlled iron spin and consistent flight.

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Pros

  • Great distance off the tee
  • Responsive spin around the greens
  • Priced lower than many other 3-piece balls

Cons

  • Not well-suited for faster swing speeds
  • You won’t get as much spin compared to a 4 or 5-piece ball

kirkland signature golf balls

The Kirkland Signature have truly evolved from their original version, and I’m quite impressed with their feel. Their standout performance during my testing is attributed to their reasonable pricing compared to more popular premium balls, like the Pro V1.

The Kirkland Signature is an excellent choice for golfers with handicaps between 10-25, especially if you’re seeking a balance between performance and cost-effectiveness. However, this is best suited for golfers with at least a moderate swing speed. Those with slower paces might find it challenging to adequately compress this ball.

 

8. Bridgestone e12 Contact

Bridgestone Golf e12 Contact

The unique Contact Force Dimple Pattern that creates 38% more surface contact on impact. Dimple pattern also makes your ball fly longer and straighter with every club in your bag.

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Pros

  • Minimizes long-game spin
  • Optimal spring off the clubface
  • Impressive ball speed
  • Medium to high launch
  • Increases friction on low-impact strikes

Cons

  • Marginally more expensive than other tour balls
  • Lower handicappers may desire more greenside spin

After examining the beauty of all-around performing tour balls, we are back with a simplistic distance option. My experience with the Bridgestone e12 Contact proved that it is an affordable, soft, and controlled ball built for the average golfer.

The 3-piece distance ball does not spin like the AVX and Z Star XV, but it was sufficient for a mid-handicapper like myself. I appreciated the reduced flight path deviation on long shots thanks to its Contact Force Dimples and Flexativ cover.

The impressive duo restricts spin revolutions on high-impact strikes, preventing ball speed loss which causes my ball to spring off my driver and fairway wood club faces. As a result, I enjoyed a mid-to-high launch and consistent flight for improved accuracy.

Besides its forgiveness, the e12 Contact produced optimal energy transfer off the tee, thanks to its Gradational core and Active Acceleration Mantle. The second potent combination in the design maximized my ball speed on long shots for ideal length.

 

9. Srixon Z Star XV

Srixon Z-Star XV

Three-piece golf ball with SpinSkin technology for enhanced greenside spin. FastLayer core for distance and soft feel. Speed Dimples for improved aerodynamics and consistent flight.

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Pros

  • Increased greenside spin
  • Excellent rebound on high-impact shots
  • Generates explosive ball speed
  • Built for fast swing speed
  • Affordable for a tour-style ball

Cons

  • Not suited to slower clubhead speed
  • Not the most durable Tour ball around

Sticking with urethane-covered balls, we turn to the Srixon Z Star XV, which best suits higher swing speed mid-handicappers. My moderate swing speed struggled to generate consistent launch, flight, and distance, but faster swingers will relish its performance.

Off the bat, I was impressed with its affordable price tag, which appeals to amateurs on a tight budget. Besides its attractive price, Srixon employed its famed FastLayer Core, which did well to boost energy transfer at impact for rapid speed and lower revolutions.

In addition, I found the firmer outer edge of the core minimized spin revolutions on high impact to further support my distance quest. However, the Z Star XV changed its tune on short iron and wedge shots, boosting backspin for hop and stop spin.

A urethane cover is finished in a Spin Skin with SeRM, which helped me increase friction on short shots for increased revolutions. Finally, like the Soft Feel, I noticed the Speed Dimple Pattern resisted deviation in flight for superior stability and control off the tee and on approach.

 

10. Wilson Triad

WILSON Triad Golf Balls

Three-layer golf ball with soft ionomer cover. Triad technology for optimal distance, control, and feel. Low compression core for soft feel and improved greenside control. High launch and low spin.

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Pros

  • Enhanced wedge spin
  • Super low driver spin
  • Stable ball flight
  • Explosive ball speed
  • Soft off the putter face

Cons

  • Not suited to slower swing speed mid-handicappers
  • More expensive than other best mid-handicapper golf balls

I close out our best balls for mid-handicapper’s review with an affordable Tour ball suited to lower mid-handicap players. I appreciated the low driver spin, accelerated ball speed, and stable flight of the Wilson Triad.

Despite entering the territory of a low handicapper, you’ll still appreciate its uncanny high moment of inertia (MOI) design. This gifted me super low driver spin and explosive pace leading to a low-to-medium launch. I probably would be more on the mid to high side if my swing speed was moderately faster.

Next, the Ultra-Thin Cast Urethane cover helped me produce exceptional backspin rpm on full wedge and short iron shots. In addition, it enhanced friction on chip shots to boost my control, feel, and feedback.

Finally, the Tri-Balanced Construction saw an equal weight distribution between the three layers to optimize stability at impact, in flight, and on the descent. The result is a well-rounded option that flies long and spins high off your wedge. However, I feel it is best suited to higher swing speed mid-handicappers.

 

The Types of Balls Best Suited for Mid Handicappers

1. Low to Medium Compression Rating

Since most mid handicappers have a slow to medium swing speed, they are better off finding something that’s a little on the soft side. Mid handicappers don’t necessarily need a super low compression rating (50 or so) like women, seniors, or high handicappers.

In most cases, a ball with a compression rating in the 60 to 80 range will work just fine for mid handicappers. A ball that has a higher compression rating than 80 will probably create too much side spin for the mid handicapper. This will make it tougher to avoid those annoyingly inaccurate tee shots with the driver.

2. Priced in The Cheap to Moderate Range

A nice thing about being a mid handicapper is that you won’t need a premium ball that costs an arm and a leg. High-end products like the Titleist Pro V1 could be worse for the mid handicapper because of their high spin rate.

As a mid handicapper, expect to pay about $1 to $3 per ball. This is about half the price of premium options. That nice chunk of savings can be put toward your greens fees instead of overpaying for balls.

 

How to Select The Ball That’s Right for You

Still not sure how to decide which ball is right for you and your game? Here’s a brief checklist of features for you to consider before purchasing.

1. Compression Rating

We talked about compression rating earlier but felt it was worth reiterating here. The key when buying balls is to find a ball that matches your swing speed. Why is that important?

If you have a slow swing speed and choose a ball that is too hard, you’ll have trouble creating the necessary rebound effect that happens on impact. That leads to reduced distance, which is a huge disadvantage for mid handicappers.

On the other hand, if you have a medium swing speed and choose a ball that is too soft, you’ll be wasting energy and sacrificing distance. It’s usually a good idea to get your swing speed measured by a professional. That makes it much easier to choose the right option.

2. Price Range

Never overpay for balls. There are so many viable options on the market, no matter what level of handicapper you are. If you’re a high or mid handicapper, you should be looking for something in the $3 or less range.

The only folks that need premium balls are the rare golfers that regularly shoot in the 70s. These low handicappers will benefit from the workability and high spin rates those balls offer.

3. Forgiveness

This feature is especially important for most amateur golfers. Most amateurs have several shots per round where they mishit the ball. If they’re using something with a high forgiveness level, those mishits won’t hurt their scorecard as much.

Most balls with a high amount of forgiveness naturally have a low amount of sidespin. Again, this is another crucial factor for golfers who struggle to hit the ball straight.

4. Short Game Spin

This is always an important factor to consider. When putting, how much do you want your ball to spin? Most golfers want the highest spin rate possible since they feel it gives them a bit more control.

The amount of greenside spin that is needed can be greatly affected by the type of courses you play and the time of year it is. Practice putting with some balls with different short game spin rates to determine what you’re most comfortable with.

 

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Matt Stevens

Matt Callcott-Stevens started playing golf at the age of 4 when Rory Sabattini's father put a 7-iron and putter in his hand. He has experienced all the highs and lows the game can throw at you and has now settled down as a professional golf writer. He holds a Postgraduate in Sports Marketing and has played golf for 28 years. Current Handicap: 8