Golf Cart Dimensions: Standard Dimensions by Seats & Brands
Written by Mike Noblin

Mike has been involved with sports for over 30 years. He's been an avid golfer for more than 10 years and is obsessed with watching the Golf Channel and taking notes on a daily basis. He also holds a degree in Sports Psychology.

Updated on June 16, 2023

You may be shocked to learn that all golf carts are unique. Even though most standard-size golf carts are around 4 feet wide, 6 feet tall, and 8 feet long, every brand and model has its unique niche.

Are you in the market for a new golf cart but unsure if it’ll fit onto your truck, or into your garage or storage space? This brief guide will dive into all popular brands and give you dimensions based on seat count.

 

Dimensions of The Average Golf Cart

Though some rare exceptions exist, most standard 2-seat golf carts are 4 feet wide. 4-seat and 6-seat golf carts are also typically the same width.

However, the height and the length will always vary based on the make, model, number of seats, and other customized factors.

2-Seat Golf Cart

The 2-seater is the one you’ll generally see while on the golf course. These are typically 4 feet wide, 8 feet long, and 6 feet tall.

4-Seat Golf Cart

Golf carts with 4 seats have two spaces facing forward and two facing the opposite direction on the back. Four-seaters are usually 4 feet wide, 9.2 feet long, and 6 feet tall.

6-Seat Golf Cart

You won’t see too many 6-seater golf carts on the course. These are more commonly seen in retirement communities. However, if you come across a 6-seater, it’ll probably be 4 feet wide, 12 feet long, and 6 feet high.

 

A Dimensions Comparison Table of Different Golf Cart Brands

Have you ever noticed that no two brands are the same regardless of what product you’re buying? This is also the case when it comes to brands of golf carts.

We created the following table as a quick guide to help you sort through all the madness. Find our favorite choices for Yamaha, Club Car, and EZGO below:

Name of Golf Cart Number of Seats Width Length Height Price
Club Car Tempo 2 or 4 48″ 91.5″ 68.5″ $ 13,274.00
Club Car Onward 2 48.75″ 92″ 71″ $ 11,606.00
Club Car Onward 4 Passenger 4 48.75″ 108″ 71″ $ 13,005.00
EZGO Express S4 4 48″ 108″ 52″ $ 12,609.00
EZGO Express S2 2 49.5″ 97″ 52″ $ 13,794.00
EZGO Freedom RXV 2 47″ 94″ 45″ $ 10,299.00
Yamaha The Drive 2 2 47″ 94″ 71″ Call 866-747-4027
Yamaha Drive 2 Concierge 4 47″ 128″ 71″ Call 866-747-4027
Yamaha UMax One 2 49″ 111″ 72″ Call 866-747-4027
Yamaha UMax Rally 2 53″ 121″ 51″ Call 866-747-4027

Will a Golf Cart Fit in a Truck Bed?

So, you’ve taken the plunge and finally bought a golf cart! However, now you have to face the question of how to get it to the golf course. Will your golf cart fit into the back of your truck, or will you need to buy a trailer?

The answer will depend on various factors, like average golf cart dimensions and the size of your truck bed.

How Wide is Your Truck Bed?

Before discussing the dimensions of a golf cart, you must first determine the size of your truck bed. Most full-size pickup trucks will leave you with more than 4 feet of space in the middle of the tire wells. In fact, most of the popular makes and models of full-size and midsize trucks are 55” to 65” wide.

Since most golf carts are only 4 feet wide (48”), most standard-size golf carts will fit into full-size trucks, at least in width. Unfortunately, width is only one part of the deal.

The Length is Where it Gets Tricky

Now, let’s tackle the length portion of the equation. Short-bed pickup trucks have grown in popularity over the last few years but aren’t the greatest for hauling your golf cart. This is because most short beds are only 58 to 68 inches long, and most standard golf carts are 96” long.

Most standard full-size truck beds clock in at 73 to 79 inches long, which still isn’t enough to accommodate a standard golf cart length. However, owners of both full and midsize trucks can solve this common problem by leaving the tailgate down. That’ll give you an extra 2 feet of space.

Obviously, a long bed pickup is an ideal option for a golf cart because you can keep the tailgate closed. Most long beds are anywhere from 96 to 97 inches long. It may be a tight squeeze, but your golf cart should fit quite comfortably into a long-bed truck.

 

How to Load Your Golf Cart into Your Truck Bed

Loading your golf cart into your truck can be difficult if you’ve never done it before. However, the following tips will help you get your cart loaded safely. Remember, always practice a safety-first mentality and ask for help if you need it.

1. Calculate the Weight of Your Golf Cart

Don’t take any unnecessary chances! Flip through your owner’s manual to find out how much your golf cart weighs. Some brands also list this information on the side of the golf cart.

2. Know the Load Capacity of Your Truck

Most pickup trucks are designed to carry heavy loads, so this shouldn’t be a huge concern. That being said, look up the load capacity just to be on the safe side.

3. Measure the Dimensions of Your Cart and Your Truck

We discussed this above, so we won’t go into great detail here. Just be sure that all of the numbers add up before you begin loading.

4. Use a Loading Ramp

You’re good to go if you have a loading dock that’s level with your truck bed. Simply lower your tailgate and safely drive your golf cart into the truck bed. Be careful not to damage your tailgate.

If you’re going to be loading and unloading your golf cart regularly and don’t have access to a loading dock, some aluminum ramps are a savvy investment. These are durable, lightweight, and they don’t cost much. Since ground clearance is a concern, we prefer ramps with an arch in them to avoid any problems.

5. Use Ratchet Straps

Now that your golf cart is safely in the truck bed, use some ratchet straps to tie everything down. You don’t want the cart to move around in the truck bed while driving. For even more safety, put the cart’s emergency brake on.

 

Mike Noblin

Mike has been involved with sports for over 30 years. He's been an avid golfer for more than 10 years and is obsessed with watching the Golf Channel and taking notes on a daily basis. He also holds a degree in Sports Psychology.